Students

po174. Durham University Disinvestment Campaign 2

As part of a long-running campaign to pressure Durham University to sell its shares in companies operating in South Africa, in the autumn of 1974 Durham Students Union asked Junior Common Rooms at all the university’s constituent colleges to discuss and vote on the issue. This poster, asking students to vote for disinvestment, echoes an iconic first world war army recruitment poster. At the subsequent meetings, over 63% of students who voted supported the disinvestment campaign.

po175. Durham University Disinvestment Campaign 3

From 1972 Durham University Students Union ran a long-running campaign to pressure Durham University to sell its shares in companies operating in South Africa. This poster asked students to support the campaign. In the early 1970s more than half of all British universities and colleges campaigned for their governing bodies to disinvest from South Africa.

po176. Durham University Disinvestment Campaign 4

As part of a long-running campaign to pressure Durham University to sell its shares in companies operating in South Africa, in the autumn of 1974 Durham Students Union asked Junior Common Rooms at all the university’s constituent colleges to discuss and vote on the issue. This poster asked students to vote for disinvestment. At the subsequent meetings, over 63% of those who voted supported the disinvestment campaign.

stu07. Durham students demonstration

Students at Durham University first asked the university authorities to sell shares in companies with South African subsidiaries in 1972. In 1974 they rejected the response of the University Council, which endorsed the British government’s code of conduct for companies investing in South Africa. This leaflet publicised a mass demonstration against the university’s refusal to sell, held in February 1975. Over 1,000 students marched through Durham. Durham University’s Vice-Chancellor responded by circulating other universities suggesting they should ensure British influence in South Africa was exerted against apartheid. This was rejected by Durham Students Union, which continued to campaign for disinvestment.

po177. ‘Support NUS Disinvestment Campaign’

Students at Durham University first asked the university authorities to sell shares in companies with South African subsidiaries in 1972. In 1974 they rejected the response of the University Council, which endorsed the British government’s code of conduct for companies investing in South Africa. This poster publicised a national demonstration against the university’s refusal to sell, held in February 1975. Over 1,000 students marched through Durham. Speakers included trade unionist John Hosey, whose son Sean was imprisoned in South Africa. Durham University’s Vice-Chancellor responded by circulating other universities suggesting they should ensure British influence in South Africa was exerted against apartheid. This was rejected by Durham students, who continued to campaign for disinvestment.

pri21. Protest against SASO trial

In the mid-1970s students became the focus of opposition in South Africa, many of them supporters of the black consciousness movement. This leaflet highlighted the case of nine SASO members charged under the Terrorism Act. It also called for the release of NUSAS President Karel Tip.

stu29. NUS/AAM conference report, 1975

In September 1971 the National Union of Students, AAM and Committee for Freedom in Mozambique, Angola and Guiné set up a student network to coordinate student campaigning on Southern Africa. Every year through the 1970s and early 1980s the network held an annual conference to discuss campaign priorities. This is the report of the conference held at Salford University in July 1975.

pic7504. ‘Free student leaders’

AAM demonstrators picketed South Africa House in August 1975 to protest against continuing detentions without trial in South Africa, including that of the Afrikaans poet Breyten Breytenbach. They also called for the release of the nine leaders of the South African Student Organisation (SASO) and Black People’s Convention (BPC) leaders on trial under the Terrorism Act.