Leaflet for a public meeting organised in Finchley, north London, as part of the AAM’s November 1963 Anti-Apartheid Month. Margaret Thatcher was the local MP.

This Declaration was signed by 160 world figures prominent in the arts, churches, academia, trade unions and politics. It called for the release of South African political prisoners, including Nelson Mandela and others arrested at Rivonia and PAC leader Robert Sobukwe. It was launched by the World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners, set up in response to a UN General Assembly resolution passed in October 1963.

The AAM organised a weekly vigil opposite the South African Embassy in the winter of 1963/64 during the trial of Nelson Mandela and his co-accused. Different groups – writers, actors, church people, politicians – took part each week. The campaign was run under the auspices of the World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners, set up in response to a UN General Assembly resolution passed in October 1963.

The AAM organised a weekly vigil opposite the South African Embassy in the winter of 1963/64 during the trial of Nelson Mandela and his co-accused. Different groups – writers, actors, church people, politicians – took part each week. The campaign was run under the auspices of the World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners, set up in response to a UN General Assembly resolution passed in October 1963.

In the 1960s the AAM used theatre to alert the British public to the increasing use of torture in South Africa. Actors like the National Theatre’s Robert Lang took part in this dramatised presentation of what it was like to be a political prisoner. Students from the University of London’s Society Against Racial Discrimination held a torchlight march to the event.

London students demonstrated in support of Nelson Mandela and other South African political prisoners in February 1964. This leaflet publicised a march preceding a dramatised presentation of prisoners’ lives organised by the World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners in Central Hall, Westminster. It was organised by University of London Union (ULU) Society Against Racial Discrimination. ULU later elected Nelson Mandela as its Honorary President.

This pamphlet set out the case for international sanctions against South Africa. It was published as a follow-up to a resolution passed by the General Council of the Student Christian Movement in September 1964 asking the UK and Irish governments to support a UN Security Council resolution imposing sanctions against South Africa. The SCM had a wide membership among students in the mid-1960s and worked closely with the Anti-Apartheid Movement.

This leaflet highlighted the death of Babla Saloojee, who was detained under the 90-day law, giving the South African police powers to hold political detainees for 90 days without trial. It quoted first-hand accounts of torture at the hands of the security police. The leaflet highlighted the sentencing of 44 people to death in 1963–64.