1960s

pri13. ‘Jailed for Life’

It was widely expected that Nelson Mandela and his co-accused in the Rivonia trial would be condemned to death. The campaign for their release was launched immediately after they were sentenced to life imprisonment in June 1964. This leaflet asked AAM supporters to write to the South African Ambassador and British Prime Minister Sir Alec Douglas-Home protesting against the sentence. 

pic6404. Marlon Brando and Abdul Minty

Marlon Brando asked film directors, actors and producers to forbid the screening of their films before segregated audiences in South Africa on a visit to London in 1964. In the photograph he is at a press conference with the AAM’s Hon. Secretary Abdul Minty. He also took part in a vigil outside South Africa House calling for the release of political prisoners.

60s20. ‘What Sort of Hypocrites Are We?’

In 1964 the AAM moved into new offices at 89 Charlotte Street and published a pamphlet, The Collaborators, and new promotional leaflets. This leaflet highlights Britain’s voting record at the UN and makes the case for sanctions against apartheid. 

60s13. The Collaborators

The Collaborators set out the case for international sanctions against South Africa. It explained how British companies profited from apartheid and how lobby groups like the South Africa Foundation defended the South African government. The pamphlet called for an immediate arms embargo and for Britain and the USA to support UN sanctions against South Africa. 

60s19. Who Cares?

In 1964 the AAM moved into new offices at 89 Charlotte Street and published a pamphlet, The Collaborators, and new promotional leaflets. This leaflet appealed to people to join the AAM on humanitarian grounds.

gov02. Memorandum to HM Government

The AAM prepared this memorandum for the Labour government elected in October 1964. It asked the government to support UN sanctions against South Africa, commit itself to freedom for South West Africa (Namibia) and contribute to the Defence and Aid Fund. It also pressed for a more stringent arms embargo.

arm04. ‘No British Arms for South Africa’

The Labour government elected in October 1964 continued to supply spare parts for South African military equipment and to train SADF personnel. It also supplied 18 Buccaneer aircraft under a contract signed by the Conservative government. The AAM campaigned against this as a betrayal of Labour Leader Harold Wilson’s pledge to ‘stop this bloody traffic in the weapons of oppression’.