Photos

AAM supporters asked spectators to boycott the Springboks v Glamorgan cricket match at St Helen’s, Swansea, 31 July 1965. They handed out leaflets to spectators and balloons with anti-apartheid slogns to children. Inside the ground the all-white South African cricket team was playing Glamorgan. The AAM in South Wales protested against the attendance at the match of the Swansea's Mayor, Alderman F C Jones.

This young anti-apartheid supporter was asking cricket fans to support an arms embargo against South Africa outside the St Helen’s cricket ground in Swansea on 31 July 1965. He was one of around 30 protesters who handed out leaflets to spectators and balloons with anti-apartheid slogns to children. Inside the ground the all-white South African cricket team was playing Glamorgan. The AAM in South Wales protested against the attendance at the match of the Swansea's Mayor, Alderman F C Jones.

A delegation of MPs on their way to 10 Downing Street to hand in a letter protesting at a visit by three British warships to Cape Town in June 1967. A motion ‘regretting the visit’ was tabled in the House of Commons and a lobby of Parliament took place on 31 May. Left to right: Liberal MP and President of the AAM David Steel, Liberal MP John Pardoe, Labour MPs Joan Lestor, Joyce Butler and Hugh Jenkins, Lord Brockway, and Labour MPs Frank Judd, Michael Barnes and Andrew Faulds.

On the march to an AAM rally in Trafalgar Square, 23 June 1968. The rally took place after ANC/ZAPU guerilla units had infiltrated Rhodesia in what became known as the Wankie and Sipolilo campaigns. In his speech, Oliver Tambo asked people in Britain to support the South African freedom fighters. The rally was chaired by Liberal MP David Steel and the other speakers were British Council of Churches representative Paul Oestreicher, trade union leader Jack Jones, Labour MPs Joan Lestor and Andrew Faulds and Young Liberal George Kiloh. The march was organised by an ad hoc youth and students committee.

Part of the crowd at an AAM rally in Trafalgar Square, 23 June 1968. The rally took place after ANC/ZAPU guerilla units had infiltrated Rhodesia in what became known as the Wankie and Sipolilo campaigns. In his speech, Oliver Tambo asked people in Britain to support the South African freedom fighters. The rally was chaired by Liberal MP David Steel and the other speakers were British Council of Churches representative Paul Oestreicher, trade union leader Jack Jones, Labour MPs Joan Lestor and Andrew Faulds and Young Liberal George Kiloh. A march to Trafalgar Square was organised by an ad hoc youth and students committee.

Nottingham students occupied the Nottingham University’s Portland building in 1968 in protest against the university’s links with the Smith regime in Rhodesia.

Vigil calling for ‘no independence before majority rule’ (NIBMAR) in Zimbabwe in January 1969. The vigil took place during the 1969 Commonwealth conference. In October 1968 British Prime Minister Harold Wilson met Ian Smith on board HMS Fearless to put new proposals for a settlement in Rhodesia which fell far short of NIBMAR. The negotiations broke down but the British government did not withdraw the Fearless plan. In the photo is Liberal Party leader Jeremy Thorpe MP.

The Consultation on Racism held in Notting Hill, London, 19–24 May 1969 led to the setting up of the WCC’s Programme to Combat Racism (PCR). The consultation concluded that force could be used to combat racism in situations where non-violent political strategies had failed. The PCR gave grants for humanitarian use to the Southern African liberation movements and other anti-apartheid organisations, including the AAM. In the centre of the photograph are the Archbishop of Canterbury Michael Ramsey and Trevor Huddleston.