Political prisoners

pic7309. SATIS founding conference, 1973

Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society (SATIS) was a coalition that worked for the release of political prisoners in Southern Africa. Its founding conference, attended by 200 people on 8 December 1973, split into workshops like the one in the photograph addressed by former political prisoner Hugh Lewin. The conference set up a campaign that brought together the AAM, International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF), National Union of Students, and the Ruskin and AUEW (TASS) Kitson Committees. For the next 20 years SATIS worked on behalf of Southern African political prisoners and for the release of all those detained without trial. In the 1980s it led campaigns to save the lives of political activists sentenced to death by the apartheid government.

pri18. SATIS founding conference, 1973

Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society (SATIS) was a coalition that worked for the release of political prisoners in Southern Africa. Two hundred people attended its founding conference on 8 December 1973. The conference focused on South Africa, but for the next 20 years it campaigned on behalf of prisoners in all the white-dominated countries of Southern Africa. In the 1980s it led campaigns to save the lives of political activists sentenced to death by the apartheid government.

pri17. SATIS founding conference, 1973

Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society (SATIS) was a coalition that worked for the release of political prisoners in Southern Africa. Two hundred people attended its founding conference on 8 December 1973. They set up a campaign that brought together the AAM, IDAF, National Union of Students and the Ruskin and AUEW (TASS) Kitson Committees. For the next 20 years SATIS worked on behalf of political prisoners and for the release of all those detained without trial. In the 1980s it led campaigns to save the lives of political activists sentenced to death by the apartheid government.

po026. Release All Political Prisoners in Southern Africa Join the Campaign

Poster produced by Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society (SATIS) soon after its launch on 8 December 1973. SATIS was set up by the AAM, International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF), National Union of Students, the AUEW (TASS) and Ruskin Kitson Committees and London Trades Council. It campaigned on behalf of political prisoners throughout Southern Africa for the following 20 years.

pri19. Political prisoners petition

This petition was one of the first initiatives of Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society (SATIS), set up by the AAM, International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF), National Union of Students, and Ruskin College and AUEW (TASS) Kitson Committees in December 1973. SATIS also asked supporters to adopt individual prisoners and organised a series of vigils on the steps of St Martin’s-in-the-Fields. The petition was signed by over 30,000 people and presented to the Chair of the UN Special Committee Against Apartheid at the AAM’s Freedom Convention on 30 June 1974.

pic7408. Good Friday vigil, 1974

AAM supporters held a 24-hour vigil on the steps of St Martin’s in the Fields on Good Friday, 11–12 April 1974 to call for the release of all South African political prisoners. They collected over 2,500 signatures for a petition to be presented to the UN in June. The vigil and petition were part of the campaign launched by Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society (SATIS) at its founding conference in December 1973. In the photograph are Kay Hosey, mother of political prisoner Sean Hosey, and Rev Paul Oestreicher.

70s12. Southern Africa Freedom Convention

The AAM celebrated its 15th anniversary with a ‘Freedom Convention’ at Camden Lock, London on 30 June 1974. Stalls displayed information about South Africa, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Portugal’s African colonies. A petition for the release of South African prisoners with 30,000 signatures was presented to Nigeria’s UN Ambassador Edwin Ogbu, Chair of the UN Special Committee Against Apartheid. The Convention also highlighted the call for a boycott of all South African products.

pic7403. Southern Africa Freedom Convention

The AAM celebrated its fifteenth anniversary with a ‘Freedom Convention’ at Camden Lock, London on 30 June 1974. Stalls displayed information about South Africa, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Portugal’s African colonies. A petition for the release of South African prisoners with 30,000 signatures was presented to Nigeria’s UN Ambassador Edwin Ogbu, Chair of the UN Special Committee Against Apartheid. The Convention also highlighted the call for a boycott of all South African products.