1980s

80s62. The Case for a Gold Sanction

The World Gold Commission was launched in 1988 on the initiative of the Anti-Apartheid Movement, End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA), the African National Congress (ANC) and South West Africa People’s Organisation (SWAPO). It exposed the central role gold mining played in the apartheid economy and campaigned for a worldwide ban on South African gold. This report set out a three-part strategy: gold sanctions against South Africa; the release equivalent quantities of gold from other countries’ reserves; and a training programme for South African exile students to learn gold mining and marketing skills. 

pic8917. Freedom Run, Brockwell Park

In June 1989 the AAM held its first ‘Freedom Run’ in Brockwell Park, Brixton, south London in June 1989. The Freedom Run became an annual event where stalls sold anti-apartheid badges, T-shirts and other goods, and sponsored runners raised funds for the AAM.

pic8926. ‘Don’t Buy Apartheid!’

This Wales AAM supporter was asking passers-by not to buy products from South Africa. He was taking part in a demonstration outside the Holiday Inn in Cardiff. The Holiday Inn group had a chain of hotels in South Africa. The AAM’s countrywide Boycott Apartheid 89 campaign focused on tourism and imports of coal and gold, as well as wine and fruit.

pic8919. The Southern Africa Coalition, 1989

The Southern Africa Coalition was launched on 1 September 1989 to press the British government to impose targeted sanctions against South Africa. These included a ban on imports of coal and agricultural products and on loans to South Africa. The Coalition brought together a wide range of organisations, including trade unions, churches, overseas aid agencies and the Anti-Apartheid Movement

80s56. The Southern African Coalition

The Southern Africa Coalition was launched on 1 September 1989 to press the British government to impose targeted sanctions against South Africa. These included a ban on imports of coal and agricultural products and on loans to South Africa. The Coalition brought together a wide range of organisations, including trade unions, churches, overseas aid agencies and the Anti-Apartheid Movement.

pic8922. Picketing Tesco in Sheffield

Sheffield MP Richard Caborn and Lord Mayor Tony Damms with Sheffield AAM supporters outside Tesco on 13 October 1989. Over 2,000 shoppers signed Sheffield AA Group’s petition asking Tesco to stop selling South African goods. Earlier in the year, 320 of Tesco 380 stores all over Britain were picketed in a special Day of Action on 22 April.

pic8921. Protesting against the cricket tour of South Africa, August 1989

The AAM campaigned to stop the 1990 rebel cricket tour of South Africa, led by Mike Gatting. It picketed 40 county cricket matches involving members of the team. These demonstrators are outside the Oval. The tour was cut short by protests inside South Africa and made a big financial loss.

po162. A Call to Britain and the Commonwealth

This poster reproduced an press advertisement calling on the 1989 Commonwealth  Heads of Government meeting to impose further sanctions on South Africa. In 1986 the Commonwealth imposed limited sanctions, constrained by British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s refusal to agree to more wide-ranging measures. The Southern Africa Coalition was a broad coalition of British organisations, including churches, trade unions, overseas development organisations and the AAM, launched on 1 September 1989 to pressure the British government ot impose targeted sanctions against South Africa.