Namibia

nam11. International Week of Solidarity

Many of the companies named in this leaflet were picketed during a Week of Action on Namibia, 27 October–3 November 1982. A former worker at RTZ’s Rossing uranium mine, Arthur Pickering, and a representative of SWAPO’s Women’s Council, Frieda Williams, spoke at 50 meetings all over Britain. The demonstrations were organised by the AAM and the Namibia Support Committee as part of a UN International Week of Solidarity with the people of Namibia. 

nam41. SWAPO Medical Kits Appeal

The Namibia Support Committee made regular appeals for medical supplies for Namibian refugees. This leaflet listed equipment and medicines needed by the South West Africa People’s Organisation’s (SWAPO) Health Department. The AAM helped distribute the leaflet and local AA groups and the AAM’s Women’s and Health Committees held collections for NSC appeals.

po075. Free All South African & Namibian Political Prisoners

One of many posters published by the Anti-Apartheid Movement to publicise the campaign for the release of political prisoners in South Africa and Namibia.

pic8307. Namibia Week of Action, 1983

Demonstrators marched to London’s Jubilee Gardens to protest against British companies’ support for South Africa’s illegal occupation of Namibia, as part of a Week of Action on Namibia, 27 October–3 November 1983. The march served ‘summonses’ at the offices of companies that collaborated with South Africa’s illegal rule in Namibia. The Week of Action featured a speaking tour by SWAPO representative Jacob Hannai and a special leaflet on Barclays and Namibia. It was organised by the AAM and the Namibia Support Committee.

nam12. Week of Action on Namibia

Demonstrators marched to London’s Jubilee Gardens to protest against British companies’ support for South Africa’s illegal occupation of Namibia, during a second annual Week of Action on Namibia, 27 October–3 November 1983. The march served ‘summonses’ at the offices of companies that collaborated with South Africa’s illegal rule in Namibia. During the week, demonstrations were held outside the headquarters of Barclays Bank and the Central Electricity Board.

gov23. Letter from Malcolm Rifkind to Des Starrs

Letter from Malcolm Rifkind, Minister of State at the Foreign Office, replying to a request from Des Starrs, Chair of Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society (SATIS), for the British government to intervene on behalf of the Kassinga detainees. In 1978 South African armed forces killed around 600 Namibian refugees at Kassinga refugee camp in Angola and took hundreds more prisoner. Five years later some of them were still held in detention in Namibia. Malcolm Rifkind turned down the request for a meeting on the grounds that he had already met an AAM delegation to discuss repression in the Ciskei.

pic8407. Namibia torture protest

Namibia Support Committee protesters called for the recognition of SWAPO freedom fighters Sam Mundjindji and Veiko Nghitewa as prisoners of war. The protest marked the opening of their trial on 5 February 1984. The two men had been subject to months of torture and solitary confinement. They were eventually released in July 1989 in the run-up to Namibian independence.

nam17. ‘Namibia: Independence Now!’, 1984

In the autumn of 1984 the AAM and Namibia Support Committee campaigned to raise Namibia’s public profile in Britain and change government policy. This Declaration was endorsed by over 400 organisations and 6,000 individuals. It was presented to the British Prime Minister by a delegation led by the Bishop of Stepney on 10 December, the 25th anniversary of the South African massacre of 11 Namibians in Katutura township, Windhoek.